The Bayonet

Tuesday, Jun. 17, 2014

Around the Army

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DOD statement on Bergdahl investigation

WASHINGTON - The Army has initiated its investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the disappearance and capture of Sgt. Bowe R. Bergdahl from Combat Outpost Mest-Lalak in Paktika Province, Afghanistan, on or about June 30, 2009. The Army has appointed as the investigating officer Maj. Gen. Kenneth R. Dahl, an Army officer with Afghanistan combat experience.

The primary function of this investigation, as in any other investigation, is to ascertain facts and report them to the appointing authority. These types of investigations are not uncommon and serve to establish the facts on the ground following an incident. The investigating officer will have access to previously gathered documentary evidence, including the 2009 investigation.

"The Army's top priority remains Sgt. Bergdahl's health and reintegration," said Army spokeswoman Lt. Col. Alayne Conway. "We ask that everyone respect the time and privacy necessary to accomplish the objectives of the last phase of reintegration. The investigating officer will not interview Sgt. Bergdahl until the reintegration team clears such interaction, so no timeline for completion of the investigation has been set."

Networks forensics tested during NIE

FORT BLISS, Texas - The Army's semi-annual, large-scale Network Integration Evaluation saw the technology of network forensics make an impact at NIE 14.2, the latest NIE, which concluded earlier this month.

The U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground traditionally provides expertise in instrumentation for technology-based systems and is the Army's designated tester for C4ISR systems, as part of the Army Test and Evaluation Command. USAEPG supported the U.S. Army Operational Test Command, under ATEC, during this latest NIE. This year, in addition to supporting with instrumentation, USAEPG brought a network forensics team to the technology-centric field evaluation.

"The (network forensics) team we took out there brought a commercial-off-the-shelf suite of software," said Sgt. Maj. John L. Herring, the senior enlisted advisor for USAEPG, "and produced a state-of-the-art package that was accessible by everyone that was out there."

"Our military relies on networked systems to fight and win our nation's wars," said Col. Tim M. Karcher, USAOTC chief of staff. "Network forensics tools that EPG brought to the fight allow us to look inside the network, to peel back the onion, and quickly resolve problems during these types of test events."

According to Ed D. Watt, a project engineer with USAEPG, network forensics offers network operators and systems administrators the ability to monitor network traffic and data in real time. This allows technology professionals to establish a baseline of how normal network traffic should behave on the monitored network. This capability enables these professionals to identify network issues quickly, like improperly configured or failing equipment and unauthorized use, among other network issues.

"When you start cleaning up the small things, the network gets better, data goes faster, all of a sudden, it's a force multiplier," said Watt, referring to the value of an efficient network for military operations.

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