The Bayonet

Tuesday, Apr. 15, 2014

ARTB combines Airborne, Ranger legacies

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The Ranger Training Brigade has changed its name and has more Soldiers as part of the Maneuver Center of Excellence's reorganization efforts, but commander Col. Kyle Lear said the brigade's legacy is still set apart in producing top Soldiers across the Army.

Now called the Airborne and Ranger Training Brigade, the Rangers course along with the Basic Airborne Course, Pathfinder and Jumpmaster Schools of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, are housed under one central location. Lear said the ARTB is the only brigade in the Army that specializes in this training.

"It's a relationship that fits like a glove," Lear said. "They do a lot of high technical training that's NCO focused just like the Ranger course is. It's high-risk just like we are and the NCOs in the 507th are just like the NCOs in the Ranger Training Brigade side of the house."

The ARTB is using this union to its advantage by taking standards from the schools and applying tactical and training elements to each. Lear said the 1,200 cadre across the brigade are crucial in maintaining the same level of standards that each school has held for decades.

"Right now we are looking at the instructor certification program for 507th and applying the best practices of the Ranger Training Brigade to the instructors," Lear said. "If a Ranger who graduates and is not an Airborne-qualified Soldier or officer when he comes here, we will offer to his unit to send him to the Airborne course."

The public is also invited to see the impact of the ARTB during monthly Rangers in Action demonstrations and the annual Best Ranger Competition held at Fort Benning. Lear said these events provide knowledge and interest to the community and attract an enthusiastic group of future Soldiers.

"It really excites the crowds and I think every time our high school students and people come, you have at least four or five who are volunteering to serve the Army, they just don't know it yet," Lear said. "They're very excited about serving in the Army and serving their county. I really think every time we do one of those, we're creating the next generation of Soldiers."

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